Progress on our Month of Sundays Project

Our project was simple: both of us sit in front of the same window every Sunday. One would describe in pictures; the other, poetry. The aim: to capture through shared art practice what the anecdote presents as an exaggerated condition of time. At session number thirty or so, we knew the experience had already been successful.

Here are some of the latest images (podcasts, videos, and other media on the project available throughout our blog).

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These squares represent the passage, roughly, from fall to winter, or late October to November. Each page of the sketch pad is window-eye’s view of a calendar month, four Sundays.

Above, is a draft—only a snippet of Sara’s prodigious writing output during a single Sunday session. Each session runs about two hours long, by the way, and by the end of a typical stint, Sara goes through several pages of drafting.

Nov 18 soft pastels

Nov 18 soft pastels

another poem draft from a Sunday session by Sara

another poem draft from a Sunday session by Sara

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from Sep 30 to Oct 21… A week? of Sundays

from Sep 30 to Oct 21… A week? of Sundays

the view that inspires it all. Sara’s “Through One Pane” appears as well.

the view that inspires it all. Sara’s “Through One Pane” appears as well.

This view took up the hour or two of a vivid November Sunday.

This view took up the hour or two of a vivid November Sunday.

We give thanks this holiday season for the gifts of togetherness and time, which this project both reflects and honors in our lives.

Collaging in the Studio

Although November is upon us, some leaves still hold the blush of September. This is particularly true of the young dogwood tree that sits in a place of honor in our backyard. Her red leaves remain a powerful scarlet. Yesterday, we foraged some as inspiration for our fall almanac, an homage to autumnal foliage.

First, we arranged the leaves in the shape of an E. Then, we made a photo model for Sara’s collage work.

First, we arranged the leaves in the shape of an E. Then, we made a photo model for Sara’s collage work.

The photo model served as inspiration for a felt collage.

The photo model served as inspiration for a felt collage.

A few snips of the scissors and swipes of the modge podge later, and our own leaf letter is on display.

Here’s a side by side view of the photo and the collage.

Here’s a side by side view of the photo and the collage.

Michael marked the areas for shadow on the photo model so that Sara could use collage materials to place the E in space.

Artistic materials, both natural and unnatural, meet on the art table.

Time to apply felt to canvas with modge podge and brush.

Time to apply felt to canvas with modge podge and brush.

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The E contributes to a larger whole— an almanac that can be read as a poem and experienced as a visual image, simultaneously.

A background completes the collage.

A background completes the collage.

Several photos equal nearly two hours in the studio. Of course, there are other measures of time and value at work in all of this making, and, wile some of those measures belong to the bronzed world of falling leaves, still others belong entirely with you.

Progress on our Fallmanac

We’re hard at work on multiple almanacs. There’s about four Almanac sized works in our Month of Sundays project, compiling the collaborative art we’ve made while sitting next to each other and overlooking a single view every Sunday.

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There’s an entire Almanac we are making of flower tiles. We call it the Floramanac.

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We are also looking to make an entire piece out of birch bark. Stay tuned for that as well.

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In the meantime, we are working on a piece that reflects on our experience of this autumn. We aimed for it to imitate the verbal capacities of Almanac #3.

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As with this one, we wanted our Fallmanac to be seen as a poster from across the room, with mainly lettering being visible, but also to be viewable from a closer vantage as an intricate interweaving of words, images, and collage—neither a poem nor a painting.

an early arrangement of gridded letters in our Fallmanac

an early arrangement of gridded letters in our Fallmanac

Here’s our latest version of the Fallmanac with views of letters like leaves, falling into and out of color.

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Sculpting Flowers Or, The Florascope

We have been working on sculpture lately. Transposing our design aesthetic of the grid onto sculpted figures has been both a challenge and a reprieve. The summer's yield of blooms has served as inspiration. Below, you'll see three images from our latest almanac-in-progress, a sculpted homage to the buds around us.

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The day lily is a plentiful inhabitant of our front gardens. Though her many green limbs can be a gardener's curse at times, we think she's worth the effort.

michael and sara chaney lilac

Liatris, Blazing Star, Gayfeather. This towering purple bristler is one of our favorite perennials. It was a joy to sculpt.

michael and sara chaney art coneflower

We know July is here when the cone flower blooms. This medicinal flower lasts well into August and is wonderful for cuttings.

When the winter months roll around again, we'll look with satisfaction on this almanac, we know.

 

 

ampersands

We are working on our latest Almanacs. On the wall currently are several canvases in progress. At the moment, our favorite is based on the ampersand.

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This is the under-painting. Next, we're dividing up the cells to depict inclusive and additive elements.

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We've already begun on two panels or cells.

The obligatory sun & moon

The obligatory sun & moon

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This one is less forceful in its relation to the ampersand. We think it's perfect, nevertheless. It sets off the birch bark in shimmering contrast against the darker shades of the oil paint.

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And...

It's a Spring thing.